On our way going back from Nimbin to our AirBnb cottage in Skinner’s Shoot in Byron Bay, we passed by the city of Lismore to do some groceries. I like churches so we had to stop to take a photo of this one,

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

The Anglican Parish of Lismore

and heard birds noisily playing at a nearby tree. I love the colorful birds of Australia. When I came back to Australia in July, I had loved walking around the campus of Macquarie University where my sister’s husband works. Their home is just by the outskirts of the campus but on the other side of the commercial area. I would cross the campus when I needed groceries or do some boutique shopping. Birds of all kinds flocked about that I almost wished I was a bird watcher.

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016) 

Lismore is the center of the Northern Rivers region of NSW. In 2015, it had an estimated population of about 30,000.

Across the Anglican church is the pink building that is the Lismore Courthouse.

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Around the city of Lismore, one can visit many tiny postcard-perfect villages dotting the region, each with its own character and charms. (Click here to visit their Tourism website).

We went to the town of Bangalow the next day just to have a look around. It is a little bigger than Nimbin, less eccentric, but no less interesting. We had a good time exploring the town on foot. There are fascinating clothing stores, bookstores, cafes, and restaurants. I loved the buildings that reminded me of the homes in Florida and Georgia.

Bangalow is a small town with a population of 1,902. The town is 765 kilometres (475 mi) north of Sydney and 167 kilometres (104 mi) south of Brisbane, just off the Pacific Highway. With Nimbin to the west and Byron Bay to the east, Bangalow is in the centre of the counter culture.

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Bangalow is one of those country gems: a picturesque, largely nineteenth-century streetscape of tall verandahed buildings, shady trees and quiet parks. Bangalow’s historic buildings have been restored largely to their former style, retaining the wide verandahs that provide shady footpaths for al fresco dining. Restaurants, cafés, art galleries, oriental rug and antique shops now occupy the old banks and drapery stores. There is, however, still a remnant of the old country village in Bangalow, as evidenced by the CWA shop selling knitted teddies and lace doilies, the old pharmacy that retains its glass apothecary’s jars and wooden benches, and the old-fashioned hardware store.” The Byron Bay Guide

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

Byron Bay, Australia (March 2016)

In one of the paper and craft stores, I finally succumbed to buying something. It was a poster of a girl on a white bird, flying high in the evening sky. I wanted to put it up in my daughter’s bedroom but it got left behind in one of the luggage when we moved from Manila to Torino. I would like to get it back soon and put it where I always wanted it to be. A simple poster but that girl on the bird is me and I hope that when my daughter looks at it, she would either see her mother or see herself.

I could not resist the stores. Bangalow is truly the art lover’s paradise of Byron Shire. If you find yourself in the area, you must go to this little town for it is only a short 20-minute drive away by car or by shuttle bus from Byron Bay.

Indeed, Australia will never run out of interesting places to see and do. One can spend months in this beautiful vast continent and still be continually amazed.

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